Blood on the Clocktower logoBlood on the Clocktower

8 December at 3:30 in the Community Room

“Blood on the Clocktower is a bluffing game enjoyed by 5 to 20 players on opposing teams of Good and Evil, overseen by a Storyteller player who conducts the action and makes crucial decisions.

“During a ‘day’ phase players socialize openly and whisper privately to trade knowledge or spread lies, culminating in a player’s execution if a majority suspects them of being Evil.

“Of a ‘night’ time, players close their eyes and are woken one at a time by the Storyteller to gather information, spread mischief, or kill. Use all your powers of deduction and deception to survive this game of murder and mystery.

“The Storyteller uses the game’s intricate playing pieces to guide each game, leaving others free to play without a table or board. Players stay in the thick of the action to the very end even if their characters are killed, haunting Ravenswood Bluff as ghosts trying to win from beyond the grave.

“The tension and excitement builds for everyone as the bodies of victims pile ever higher…”  (https://bloodontheclocktower.com/)

This is a game that is near and dear to my family’s heart: my own teenagers were able to play it long before the game went on the market.  We have played it with family, with friends, and with strangers at game events, and this has the best mechanics of any social-deduction game I have ever played.  (For one thing, every character has a different power; for another, even if your character dies, you’re not out of the game!)

My oldest has agreed to run the game as Storyteller.  Come play, try to survive until the end, and help your team – good or evil – win.

NOTE: We do need an advance head count for this, so please reserve a spot on the event page

If you would like to attend and need accommodations, please contact me directly (edoherty[AT]ocln.org) so I can set them up. If you require a CDI or ASL interpreter, please contact me at least two weeks in advance so I have time to find someone. Thank you.

Anime Club Flyer, repeat of post textAnime Club

Early Release Days, 12-3

Come join us in the Community Room every early-release day as we watch episodes of various shows, hang out, and snack.

Thanks to Crunchyroll’s library-outreach program, we have access to everything on their site.  Please reach out to me if there’s a particular show you’d like to watch.

Next meeting: December 9th at 12 in the CHILDREN’S PROGRAM ROOM

We watch the subtitled, not the dubbed, versions of shows. If you need accommodations for this or any other program, please contact me directly (edoherty[AT]ocln.org) so I can set them up.

Drop-In Button Making in the YA Room

Next Opportunity: Thursday, December 15th at 2:30

Drop in and design a button (or two, or three…) to take with you!

Finished buttons are 2-1/4″ in diameter.

If you would like to attend and need accommodations, please contact me directly (edoherty[AT]ocln.org) so I can set them up. If you require a CDI or ASL interpreter, please contact me at least two weeks in advance so I have time to find someone. Thank you.

Brief repetition of the event description with a copy of the full calendar for the yearNo-Book Book Club

December 20 at 3:30 – Mystery

What draws us to mysteries? Is it an urge to make sense of the world? The satisfaction of knowing that the guilty party will be discovered? The tension of wondering if the main character will solve the crime before another one is committed? Or do people just like puzzles?

“Mystery” as a genre covers a lot of ground, and you can probably find a subgenre to suit you no matter what your reading preference. Do you like historical fiction? Well, Elizabeth Peters wrote a number of books about an Egyptologist set around the turn of the twentieth century, while Ellis Peters (no relation) wrote about a 12th-century monk and amateur detective called Brother Cadfael. There are also the classic private detective stories, such as those of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes or Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot. There are subgenres as specific as “Nordic noir,” typified by the novels of Jo Nesbø and Henning Mankell, or even “Animal Detectives,” such as the Mrs Murphy novels by Rita Mae Brown (purportedly cowritten by her cat, Sneaky Pie).

There have been many mystery TV shows, from the classic Columbo series to the more modern Broadchurch and the unutterably bizarre Twin Peaks.

Even if you don’t like those, you might enjoy playing mystery video games, such as the classic Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney series, the more current Disco Elysium, or “interactive movies” such as Her Story and Immortality.

Come join us on December 20th as we talk about the mystery genre and watch a movie.

On January 17, we’ll talk about awards.

If you would like to attend and need accommodations, please contact me directly (edoherty[AT]ocln.org) so I can set them up. If you require a CDI or ASL interpreter, please contact me at least two weeks in advance so I have time to find someone. Thank you.